Programs

Preschool Program

School Readiness

Infant/Toddler Program

Kindergarten Transition

Nutrition

After School

Preschool Program

MSOE is a unique program because it offers strong component of Montessori education blended with current best practices in Early Childhood Education.  Montessori Education provides a unique individualized program for children.  Children work independently, with another child or in a group.  They are given the opportunity and privilege to work alone without interruption.

MSOE also provides elements of the curriculum from the traditional Early Childhood model.  There are times of the day when children participate in role playing or play in the pretend play area.  This often supports the curriculum “studied” during the Montessori work cycle.  For example: if the children are studying the classification of animals, the dramatic play area might be a zoo.

The Montessori classroom is a beautifully prepared, enriched environment, with child-sized furnishings and materials within reach of even the smallest student. There is a broad range of activities to meet the needs of the children from three to five years old.  The activities and materials allow each child the opportunity to find work suitable for his or her stage of development. All children are allowed to develop at their own pace, and according to their own capacities in a non-competitive and supportive atmosphere. The work in the classroom fall into seven (7) main categories:

  1. Practical Life: Activities are designed to aid a child to function in his own environment.  Activities in this area include preparing food, pouring, sorting and folding clothes, housekeeping, polishing, sewing, hammering, and taking care of dressing toileting, selecting activities, and cleaning up.
  2. Sensorial: With materials designed to use all of the senses, children acquire the ability to separate and classify forms, colors, textures and smells.  The sensorial area may well be called the cornerstone of the environment, as the child develops skills in thinking, judging, concentrating, comparing, sequencing, discriminating, and differentiating.
  3. Language:    The environment and lessons throughout the classroom enhance the children’s vocabulary. The children are encouraged to converse with other children and the adults in the environment.  Some of the activities in this area are the singing of songs, storytelling, writing, reading, library visits, and developing the skills of listening and sharing in ideas.
  4. Math: The math curriculum consists of the many Montessori math materials. The child is introduced to numeration and brought through the following sequence on the concrete level: numeration, base ten, linear counting, and the four operations.  Math is everywhere in our world and it is wonderful when a child notices that!
  5. Geography and Science:  There are several aspects of geography that appeal to children. They have a strong interest in other children from other countries – their clothes, homes, parents, and school.
  6. Movement and Music:  The classroom is designed by the teacher to ensure purposeful movement.  This is done with such activities as: walking on the line, engaging in finger-plays, carrying objects and trays, sitting, dancing as well as outside time with balls, kites, and playground apparatus. Music is easily integrated into movement, with dance and line activities, but certainly not limited to that.  There is an abundance of songs and finger-plays.    Montessori bells are a part of the sensorial area.
  7. Art:  Art is an area where children freely express themselves, whether they are painting at the easel, gluing, cutting, stapling, taping or coloring.  Children also work with clay, wood, recyclable items and other 3 dimensional projects.
  8. Social / Emotional Development:  The children will be provided with opportunities to exhibit curiosity, creativity, and independence in all learning situations.  The following social-emotional indicators will be observed:  development of emotional expressions, development of self-regulation, self-control, and self-help skills. There is also a focus on peaceful living and a peaceful world filled with kindness but also polite boundaries.
  9. Physical Development:  Children will be provided with opportunities to engage in a wide variety of gross-motor activities that are selected and teacher initiated.  Children will develop fine control and gross motor coordination.

School Readiness

Primary classrooms (age three to five) are supported by the City of New Haven’s School Readiness Program and follow the policies required by both the State Department of Education and the American Montessori Society (AMS) methodology.

The New Haven School Readiness Program endorses the use of the Connecticut Preschool Curriculum and Assessment Frameworks (PCF/PAF) as the basis for planning learning experiences, observing and documenting child progress, and implementing teaching strategies.  Programs that adopt PCF/PAF must align curriculum with the standards and benchmarks outlined in the PCF/PAF.  The curriculum used by MSOE is based on the American Montessori Society guidelines and aligns with PCF/PAF in most respects.  However, MSOE uses the PCF/PAF standards and benchmarks as a guide to develop lesson plans, observations, and to assess progress.

Primary Special Activities: Spanish, Art, and Music are also incorporated into the aftercare program.

Infant/Toddler Program

MSOE infant and toddlers range in age from six weeks to three years.  The MSOE Infant/Toddler curriculum maximizes the development of young children in a nurturing, inviting and orderly setting, referred to as the “Prepared Environment”.  Activities lead the child to build sensory motor skills, socialization skills, self-esteem, inner security and habits of concentration.  The goal of the curriculum is to foster independence and focus.

Each learning area is designed to introduce or enhance the following skills:
Language development, Social development, Cognitive skills, Physical development, Independence, Sense of Community, Fine Motor skills, Large Motor skills, Sense of Humor, Creativity, Imagination, Safety, Problem-Solving, Self-Control, Self-Help skills, Manners, Pre-Reading and Reading skills, Pre-writing and writing skills, Eye/Hand coordination, Relationships with Adults and Children, Expression of Feelings, Completion of Task, Care of Materials and Environment, and Sharing.

(Note: The complexity of task will vary depending on the child’s age and skills. Teachers know that each child will learn in different ways and at different stages. Some activities will be initiated by a teacher so that the child will learn to master and gain independence. These skills are encouraged throughout the year.)

The following curriculum activities are used throughout the year to guide lesson planning:

  • Care of self
  • Sense of self
  • Social relations
  • Care of environment
  • Language and communication
  • Group time finger play
  • Pre-math
  • Exploring objects
  • Practical life
  • Space
  • Time
  • Props
  • Music
  • Creative representation
  • Manipulative
  • Sensorial \ Stationary work
  • Large motor activities indoor/outdoor
  • Suggested books for reading

Kindergarten Transition

MSOE offers a six week program from July through August for children transitioning to kindergarten. Children are assessed for their literacy, cognitive, social emotional and physical development based on the Connecticut Kindergarten Inventory Assessment. We discuss the results of the assessment with parents  to formalize a plan to promote school readiness. Children are assessed at the end of the six week period. Individual parent/teacher meetings are held to inform parents of their child’s overall progress and the level of skill attained during the kindergarten transition program.

Parents are assisted in applying to kindergarten programs, and MSOE staff visits the schools in which MSOE children have been placed to provide a profile to the kindergarten teachers, with the consent of the parent.

Neighborhood children have a residence preference to attend Amistad Academy.

Nutrition

Montessori School on Edgewood Childcare and Early Learning Center receives assistance for nutritious meals served under the Child and Adult Care Food Program. (CACFP) This program is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and administered by the Connecticut State Department of Education.  Families that meet the eligibility criteria for the program will receive meals at a free or reduced price.

MSOE adheres to CACFP guidelines when preparing food.  Our on-site serv-safe certified staff member oversees preparation and reviews weekly menus for compliance to prescribed USDA standards.

Montessori School on Edgewood provides breakfast, lunch and an afternoon snack for all except the infants. Infants are fed on demand.  Menus are posted for the week on the parent’s notice board.  Children requiring special food need notes. Breakfast is served from 7:30 to until 9:30 a.m.

After School

Children spend two and a half to three hours a day after school, from 3 to 5:30 PM, in a project-based program that fosters growth in the areas of literacy, math, science and critical thinking.  They have nourishing snacks when they arrive and then work in groups on projects in areas of interest. The children develop skills in working together and helping each other. There is also time allotted for outdoor exercise, homework and reading.

The After School Teacher works closely with parents and school teachers to assist each child in areas in which they need special help.  Computers are available for homework help, and students will be able to use age-appropriate educational websites, such as Khan Academy www.khanacademy.org).  The goal of the program is to foster independent learners who know how to find help when they need it.

New Haven has rich resources in the arts and sciences, such as the Peabody Museum, Yale Art Gallery, British Art Center, Yale Repertory theater, etc.  The After School program will integrate these resources into the program for enrichment.  Activities will foster creativity and stimulate an active interest in experimenting with new materials and ideas.

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